GDPR requires organisations seeking to operate in the EU to have the appropriate controls in place

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    The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a comprehensive data protection regulation that was implemented in May 2018. Its main objective is to protect the personal data of individuals within the European Union (EU) and ensure that organisations handle this data in a responsible and secure manner. Under GDPR, organisations that wish to operate within the EU must have the appropriate organisational and technical controls in place to ensure compliance.

    Understanding the Basics of GDPR

    GDPR stands for General Data Protection Regulation. It is a regulation that was implemented by the European Union to enhance the protection of the personal data of EU citizens. This regulation was designed to replace the outdated Data Protection Directive and strengthen the rights of individuals in respect to their personal data.

    GDPR was introduced to address the concerns and challenges posed by the rapidly evolving digital landscape, where personal data is being collected, processed, and stored in larger quantities than ever before. The main goal of GDPR is to give individuals greater control over their personal data and to ensure that organisations handle this data in a transparent and secure manner.

    The implementation of GDPR has had a significant impact on businesses and individuals alike. It has brought about a fundamental shift in the way organisations handle personal data, requiring them to be more accountable and transparent in their data processing activities.

    Under GDPR, individuals have been granted several rights that empower them to have more control over their personal data. These rights include the right to access their data, the right to rectify any inaccuracies, the right to erasure (also known as the “right to be forgotten”), the right to restrict processing, the right to data portability, and the right to object to processing.

    What is GDPR?

    The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a regulation that was implemented in May 2018 by the European Union. It sets out the rules and guidelines for the processing of personal data of individuals within the EU. GDPR applies to all organisations that collect, process, and store personal data of EU citizens, regardless of the organisation’s location.

    One of the key aspects of GDPR is its extraterritorial scope, which means that even organisations outside of the EU must comply with GDPR if they process the personal data of EU citizens. This has led to a global impact, with businesses around the world having to adapt their data protection practices to ensure compliance with GDPR.

    GDPR introduces a number of important principles that organisations must adhere to when processing personal data. These principles include the need for lawful, fair, and transparent processing; the purpose limitation, which means that personal data must be collected for specified, explicit, and legitimate purposes; data minimisation, which requires organisations to only collect and process the data that is necessary for the intended purpose; accuracy, which emphasizes the importance of keeping personal data accurate and up to date; storage limitation, which states that personal data should not be kept for longer than necessary; integrity and confidentiality, which requires organisations to implement appropriate security measures to protect personal data; and accountability, which places the responsibility on organisations to demonstrate compliance with GDPR.

    Why was GDPR implemented?

    GDPR was implemented in response to the increasing concerns about data breaches, cyber-attacks, and the misuse of personal data. The rapid advancements in technology and the digitalization of various aspects of our lives have made it necessary to update the existing data protection framework to protect individuals’ privacy rights more effectively.

    With the proliferation of social media platforms, online shopping, and digital services, individuals are sharing more personal information online than ever before. This has raised concerns about the security and privacy of personal data, as well as the potential for its misuse by organisations.

    GDPR aims to harmonize data protection laws across the EU member states and provide individuals with more control over their personal data. It also introduced stricter guidelines for data protection and increased the penalties for non-compliance, ensuring that organisations take the necessary measures to protect personal data.

    Since its implementation, GDPR has had a profound impact on the way organisations handle personal data. It has forced businesses to reassess their data protection practices, implement stronger security measures, and be more transparent in their data processing activities. Individuals now have more rights and control over their personal data, giving them greater peace of mind in the digital age.

    The Impact of GDPR on Organisations

    GDPR, or the General Data Protection Regulation, has had a significant impact on organisations operating within the European Union. Since its implementation in May 2018, GDPR has introduced new obligations and requirements that organisations must comply with to ensure the protection of personal data.

    Under GDPR, businesses are now required to obtain valid consent from individuals before collecting their personal data. This means that businesses must be transparent about the purposes for which data is being collected and provide individuals with the option to opt out if they choose. This shift towards consent-driven data collection aims to empower individuals and give them more control over their personal information.

    Another key aspect of GDPR is the introduction of the “right to be forgotten.” This gives individuals the right to request the deletion of their personal data. Organisations must have processes in place to respond to such requests promptly and ensure that personal data is securely deleted. This provision reinforces the importance of data privacy and allows individuals to have more control over their digital footprint.

    Furthermore, GDPR requires organisations to implement appropriate technical and organisational measures to ensure the security of personal data. This includes regularly evaluating and updating security measures, conducting risk assessments, and training employees on data protection principles. By prioritising data security, GDPR aims to reduce the risk of data breaches and protect individuals from potential harm.

    The consequences of non-compliance with GDPR

    The consequences of non-compliance with GDPR can be severe for organisations. The regulation empowers supervisory authorities to impose fines for violations, which can reach up to 4% of a company’s annual global turnover or €20 million, whichever is higher. These fines are designed to be a strong deterrent and encourage organisations to take data protection seriously.

    However, the impact of non-compliance goes beyond financial penalties. Data breaches and mishandling of personal data can have far-reaching consequences for an organisation’s reputation. In today’s digital age, news of a data breach spreads quickly, and the public is increasingly concerned about how their personal information is being handled. A single incident of non-compliance can lead to public backlash, a loss of trust from customers and business partners, and long-term damage to an organisation’s brand image.

    Therefore, it is crucial for organisations to understand and comply with the requirements of GDPR. By doing so, they not only avoid the risk of hefty fines but also demonstrate their commitment to protecting individuals’ privacy and maintaining the trust of their stakeholders.

    Organisational Controls Required by GDPR

    Organisational controls refer to the policies, procedures, and practices that organisations put in place to ensure compliance with GDPR. These controls help organisations establish a solid foundation for data protection and ensure that personal data is handled in a responsible and secure manner.

    GDPR, which stands for General Data Protection Regulation, is a comprehensive data protection law that was implemented by the European Union (EU) in 2018. It is designed to protect the privacy and personal data of EU citizens and residents. Organisations that process personal data of EU individuals are required to comply with GDPR, regardless of their location.

    Organisational controls encompass a wide range of measures that organisations must adopt to comply with GDPR. These measures include conducting data protection impact assessments, appointing a Data Protection Officer (DPO), implementing privacy-by-design principles, and creating data protection policies and procedures.

    What are Organisational Controls?

    Organisational controls are the backbone of GDPR compliance. They are the mechanisms that organisations put in place to ensure that personal data is processed lawfully, transparently, and securely.

    One key organisational control required by GDPR is the implementation of clear data protection policies and procedures. These policies and procedures outline how personal data should be handled within the organisation, including how it should be collected, stored, accessed, and shared. They also define the roles and responsibilities of employees in relation to data protection.

    Another important organisational control is the appointment of a Data Protection Officer (DPO). The DPO is responsible for overseeing the organisation’s data protection activities and ensuring compliance with GDPR. They act as a point of contact for individuals whose data is being processed and for supervisory authorities.

    Privacy-by-design is another key principle that organisations must incorporate into their processes and systems. This principle requires organisations to consider data protection and privacy from the very beginning of any project or system development. By implementing privacy-by-design, organisations can ensure that personal data is protected throughout its lifecycle.

    Data protection policies and procedures are not enough on their own. Organisations must also provide regular training and awareness programs for employees on data protection. These programs help employees understand their responsibilities and obligations under GDPR and ensure that they are equipped with the knowledge and skills to handle personal data appropriately.

    Examples of GDPR-compliant organisational controls

    Some examples of GDPR-compliant organisational controls include:

    1. Implementing clear data protection policies and procedures: Organisations should have documented policies and procedures that outline how personal data should be handled, including guidelines for data collection, storage, access, and sharing.
    2. Appointing a Data Protection Officer to oversee data protection activities: The DPO is responsible for ensuring compliance with GDPR and acts as a point of contact for individuals and supervisory authorities.
    3. Conducting regular training and awareness programs for employees on data protection: Organisations should provide training to employees to ensure they understand their responsibilities and obligations under GDPR and are aware of best practices for data protection.
    4. Establishing procedures for handling data breaches and reporting them to the relevant authorities: Organisations should have clear procedures in place for detecting, investigating, and responding to data breaches. They should also have mechanisms for reporting breaches to the relevant supervisory authorities within the required timeframe.
    5. Ensuring that data processors comply with GDPR requirements through contracts and ongoing monitoring: Organisations that engage third-party data processors must have contracts in place that include specific data protection obligations. They should also regularly monitor and assess the data processors’ compliance with GDPR.

    By implementing these and other GDPR-compliant organisational controls, organisations can demonstrate their commitment to protecting personal data and ensure compliance with the regulations. These controls not only help organisations avoid hefty fines and reputational damage but also build trust with individuals whose data they process.

    Technical Controls Required by GDPR

    Technical controls are the measures and safeguards implemented within an organisation’s IT systems to protect personal data from unauthorized access, loss, or damage. These controls are essential for ensuring the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of personal data.

    Understanding technical controls

    Technical controls involve the use of technology and security measures to protect personal data. These measures include access controls, encryption, pseudonymization, and regular security testing and monitoring. Technical controls must be designed to align with the principles of data protection and minimise the risks associated with processing personal data.

    Examples of GDPR-compliant technical controls

    Examples of GDPR-compliant technical controls include:

    • Implementing secure network and systems infrastructure
    • Encrypting personal data both in transit and at rest
    • Implementing strong access controls and authentication mechanisms
    • Regularly patching and updating software and systems to address security vulnerabilities
    • Implementing intrusion detection and prevention systems

    Implementing GDPR Compliance in Your Organisation

    Implementing GDPR compliance in your organisation requires careful planning and the allocation of appropriate resources. The following steps can help ensure GDPR compliance:

    Steps to ensure GDPR compliance

    1. Conduct a thorough data audit: Identify and document all the personal data your organisation processes, the purposes for which it is collected, and the legal basis for processing.
    2. Update your privacy policies and notices: Ensure that your privacy policies and notices are clear, concise, and accessible to individuals. They should provide information on how their personal data is processed, their rights, and the measures taken to protect their data.
    3. Implement appropriate technical and organisational controls: Establish the necessary controls to protect personal data, such as implementing access controls, encryption, and regularly reviewing and updating security measures.
    4. Train your employees: Educate your employees on GDPR requirements, data protection principles, and how to handle personal data securely. Regular training sessions and awareness programs can help ensure that everyone in your organisation understands their responsibilities.
    5. Establish processes for handling data breaches: Develop procedures for detecting, reporting, and responding to data breaches promptly. This includes notifying the relevant authorities and affected individuals, where necessary.

    Tools and resources for GDPR compliance

    Various tools and resources are available to assist organisations in achieving GDPR compliance. These include:

    • Data protection impact assessment templates
    • Data mapping and inventory tools
    • Data protection training materials
    • Data breach response and reporting guidelines
    • Guidance documents from data protection authorities

    GDPR has had a significant impact on organisations operating within the EU. It has raised awareness about the importance of data protection and the need for robust controls to safeguard personal data. By understanding the basics of GDPR, the impact on organisations, and the controls required, organisations can ensure compliance and build trust with their customers and stakeholders.

    Implementing GDPR compliance requires a comprehensive approach that encompasses both organisational and technical controls. By following the steps outlined and utilizing the available tools and resources, organisations can effectively navigate the complex landscape of data protection and ensure that they operate within the boundaries set by GDPR.

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